Free Solar Farms

Potential solar farmers and California Free Solar associates will find this PG&E Description of Service document very informative and it might also put you top sleep. Great bedtime reading.

 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11257-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 6925-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 1
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  1303-E  Issued by  Date Filed  June 21, 1990
Decision No.  Gordon R. Smith  Effective  July 31, 1990
Vice President  Resolution No.
1C1   Finance and Rates
A. GENERAL
1. The type of service available at any particular location should be determined by
inquiry at PG&E's local office.
2. Alternating-current service will be regularly supplied at a frequency of
approximately 60 Hertz (cycles per second).
3. In areas where a certain standard secondary voltage is presently being served to
one or more customers, an applicant applying for new service in such areas may
be required by PG&E to receive the same standard voltage supplied to existing
customers.
4. All electric service described in this rule is subject to the conditions in the
applicable rate schedule and other pertinent rules.
5. It is the responsibility of the applicant to ascertain and comply with the
requirements of governmental authorities having jurisdiction.
6. Service to an applicant is normally established at one delivery point, through one
meter, and at one voltage class.  Other arrangements for service at multiple
service delivery points, or for services at more than one voltage class, are
permitted only where feasible and with the approval of PG&E.  For purposes of
this rule, distribution service voltage classes, delta or wye connected, are
described as:
a. 0-300 volt source, single- or three-phase.
b. 301-600 volt source, three-phase.
c. 601-3,000 volt source, three-phase.
d. 3,001-5,000 volt source, three-phase.
e. 5,001-15,000 volt source, three-phase.
f. 15,001-25,000 volt source, three-phase.
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11896-E*
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11496-E* 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 2
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  1393-E  Issued by  Date Filed  April 21, 1992
Decision No.  Gordon R. Smith  Effective  July 1, 1992
Vice President  Resolution No.  E-3278
2C1   and Chief Financial Officer
A. GENERAL (Cont'd.)
7. New direct-current (d-c) or two-phase service is not available.  Direct-current
service and two-phase service is supplied only to existing customers who
continue to operate existing d-c or two-phase equipment.  Such service is being
gradually replaced by standard alternating-current service.
B. SERVICE DELIVERY VOLTAGES
1. Following are the standard service voltages normally available, although not all of
them are or can be made available at each service delivery point:
Distribution Voltages
 Transmission
Voltages
Single-phase
Secondary
 Three-phase
Secondary
 Three-phase
Primary 

Three-phase
120/240, 3-wire  240/120, 4-wire  2,400, 3-wire*  60,000, 3-wire
120/208, 3-wire  240, 3-wire*  4,160, 3-wire*  70,000, 3-wire
    208Y/120, 4-wire  4,160Y/2,400, 4-wire*  115,000, 3-wire
480/3-wire**  12,000, 3-wire  230,000, 3-wire  (T)
    480/277, 4-wire  12,000Y/6,930, 4-wire*
    (T)
  480Y/277, 4-wire   17,200, 3-wire 

        20,780, 3-wire
20,780Y/12,000, 4-wire 

 _______________
* Limited availability, consult PG&E.
** This service is no longer available for new or rebuilt installations.
(N)
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11611-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11259-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 3
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  1330-E-A  Issued by  Date Filed  March 1, 1991
Decision No.  Gordon R. Smith  Effective  April 1, 1991
Vice President  Resolution No.
3C1   Finance and Rates
B. SERVICE DELIVERY VOLTAGES (Cont'd.)
2. The following non-standard distribution voltages exist in certain limited areas but their
use is not being expanded and they are gradually being replaced with an appropriate
standard voltage listed in Section B.1:
a. 4,800 volts, 3-wire
b. 22,900 volts, 3-wire
c. 44,000 volts, 3-wire
3. All voltages referred to in this rule and appearing in some rate schedules are nominal
service voltages at the service delivery point.  PG&E's facilities are designed and
operated to provide sustained service voltage at the service delivery point, but the
voltage at a particular service delivery point, at a particular time, will vary within fully
satisfactory operating range limits established in Section C.
4. The point of delivery and point of metering will normally be at the same voltage and
within close proximity to each other.  When PG&E determines it is not feasible for the
point of delivery and point of metering to be at the same voltage and within close
proximity to each other, the demand and energy meter readings used in determining
the charges will be adjusted to correct for transformation and line losses.
An estimated transformer loss adjustment factor of two percent will be applied to the
demand and energy meter readings for each stage of transformation between the
point of delivery and the point of metering, unless PG&E and the customer agree that
specific transformer manufacturer test data support a different transformer loss
adjustment.
Line losses will be calculated as a function of the current through, and the electrical
characteristics of, the line between the point of delivery and point of metering.  Line
loss adjustments will apply only to customers whose bills are currently adjusted for
line losses or to services established after April 1, 1991.
C. VOLTAGE AND FREQUENCY CONTROL
1. CUSTOMER SERVICE VOLTAGES
a. Under all normal load conditions, PG&E’s distribution circuits will be operated so
as to maintain secondary service voltage levels to customers within the service
voltage ranges specified below:
(N)
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(N)
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 14079-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 13061-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 4
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  1588-E  Issued by  Date Filed  July 2, 1996
Decision No.  Steven L. Kline  Effective  August 11, 1996
Vice President  Resolution No.
4C1   Regulation
C. VOLTAGE AND FREQUENCY CONTROL (Cont’d.)
1. CUSTOMER SERVICE VOLTAGES (Cont’d.)
a. (Cont’d.) 

Nominal
Two-Wire And
Multi-Wire 

Minimum
Voltage To
 Maximum Service
Voltage On
Residential And
Commercial
Distribution Circuits 

Maximum Service
Voltage On
Agricultural And
Industrial
 Service Voltage  All Services  Class A Class B  Distribution Circuits
120  114  120 126  126
208  197  208 218  218
240  228  240 252  252
277  263  277 291  291
480  456  480 504  504 

 1) For purposes of energy conservation, PG&E's distribution voltage will
be regulated to the extent practicable to maintain service voltage on
residential and commercial distribution circuits within the minimum
and maximum voltages specified above for Class A circuits.
2) The residential and commercial distribution circuits that cannot be
operated within the minimum and maximum voltages for Class A
circuits shall be regulated to the extent practicable to maintain
service voltage within the minimum and maximum voltages for
Class B circuits and, whenever possible, within the minimum and
maximum voltages for Class A circuits.
(N)
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(N)
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11261-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 7682-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 5
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  1303-E  Issued by  Date Filed  June 21, 1990
Decision No.  Gordon R. Smith  Effective  July 31, 1990
Vice President  Resolution No.
5C1   Finance and Rates
C. VOLTAGE AND FREQUENCY CONTROL (Cont'd.)
1. CUSTOMER SERVICE VOLTAGES (Cont'd.)
b. Exceptions to Voltage Limits
Voltage may be outside the limits specified when the variations:
1) Arise from the temporary action of the elements.
2) Are infrequent momentary fluctuations of a short duration.
3) Arise from service interruptions.
4) Arise from temporary separation of parts of the system from the main
system.
5) Are from causes beyond the control of PG&E.
c. It must be recognized that, because of conditions beyond the control of
PG&E or customer, or both, there will be infrequent and limited periods when
sustained voltages outside of the service voltage ranges will occur.
Utilization equipment may not operate satisfactorily under these conditions,
and protective devices may operate to protect the equipment.
d. The sustained service delivery voltages are subject to minor momentary and
transient voltage excursions which may occur in the normal operation of
PG&E's system.  Subject to the limitations of C.1.a. above, the voltage
balance between phases will be maintained by PG&E as close as
practicable to 2½ percent maximum deviation from the average voltage
between the three phases.
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11262-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 9313-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 6
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  1303-E  Issued by  Date Filed  June 21, 1990
Decision No.  Gordon R. Smith  Effective  July 31, 1990
Vice President  Resolution No.
6C1   Finance and Rates
C. VOLTAGE AND FREQUENCY CONTROL (Cont'd.)
1. CUSTOMER SERVICE VOLTAGES (Cont'd.)
e. Where the operation of the applicant's equipment requires unusually stable
voltage regulation or other stringent voltage control beyond that supplied by
PG&E in the normal operation of its system, the applicant, at his own
expense, is responsible for installing, owning, operating, and maintaining
any special or auxiliary equipment on the load side of the service delivery
point as deemed necessary by the applicant.
f. The applicant shall be responsible for designing and operating his service
facilities between the service delivery point and the utilization equipment to
maintain proper utilization voltage at the line terminals of the utilization
equipment.
2. CUSTOMER UTILIZATION VOLTAGES
a. All customer-owned utilization equipment must be designed and rated in
accordance with the following utilization voltages specified by the American
National Standard C84.1 if customer equipment is to give fully satisfactory
performance:
 Nominal
Utilization
Voltage
 Minimum
Utilization
Voltage
 Maximum
Utilization
Voltage 

 120  110  125
 208  191  216
 240  220  250
 277  254  289
 480  440  500
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11263-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 9313-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 7
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  1303-E  Issued by  Date Filed  June 21, 1990
Decision No.  Gordon R. Smith  Effective  July 31, 1990
Vice President  Resolution No.
7C1   Finance and Rates
C. VOLTAGE AND FREQUENCY CONTROL (Cont'd.)
2. CUSTOMER UTILIZATION VOLTAGES (Cont'd.)
b. The differences between service and utilization voltages are allowances for
voltage drop in customer wiring.  The maximum allowance is 4 volts (120 volt
base) for secondary service.
c. Minimum utilization voltages from American National Standard C84.1 are
shown for customer information only as PG&E has no control over voltage
drop in customer's wiring.
d. The minimum utilization voltages shown in a. above, apply for circuits
supplying lighting loads.  The minimum secondary utilization voltages
specified by American National Standard C84.1 for circuits not supplying
lighting loads are 90 percent of nominal voltages (108 volts on 120 volt
base) for normal service.
e. Motors used on 208 volt systems should be rated 200 volts or (for small
single-phase motors) 115 volts.  Motors rated 230 volts will not perform
satisfactorily on these systems and should not be used.  Motors rated
220 volts are no longer standard, but many of them were installed on
existing 208 volt systems on the assumption that the utilization voltage would
not be less than 187 volts (90 percent of 208 volts).
3. FREQUENCY
PG&E will exercise reasonable diligence and care to regulate and maintain its
frequency within reasonable limits but does not guarantee same.
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 27763-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11264-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 8
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  3353-E  Issued by  Date Filed  October 16, 2008
Decision No.  Brian K. Cherry  Effective  November 15, 2008
Vice President  Resolution No.
8C8   Regulatory Relations
D. GENERAL LOAD LIMITATIONS
1. SINGLE-PHASE SERVICE
a. Single-phase service normally will be three-wire, 120/240 volts (or three-wire
120/208 volts at certain locations as now or hereafter established by PG&E)
where the size of any single motor does not exceed 7.5 horsepower
(10 horsepower at the option of PG&E).  For any single-phase service, the
maximum demand as determined by PG&E is limited to the capability of a
100 kVa transformer unless otherwise approved by PG&E.  If the load
requires a transformer installation in excess of 100 kVa, the service normally
will be three-phase.
b. In locations where PG&E maintains a 120/208 volt secondary system, 3-wire
single-phase service normally shall be limited to that which can be supplied
by a main switch or service entrance rating of 200 amperes.  Single-phase
loads in these locations in excess of that which can be supplied by a
200 ampere main switch or service entrance rating normally will be supplied
with a 208Y/120-volt, three-phase, 4-wire service.
(T)
(T)
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 27764-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11498-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 9
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  3353-E  Issued by  Date Filed  October 16, 2008
Decision No.  Brian K. Cherry  Effective  November 15, 2008
Vice President  Resolution No.
9C8   Regulatory Relations
D. GENERAL LOAD LIMITATIONS (Cont'd.)
2. THREE-PHASE SERVICE (2,000 VOLTS OR LESS)  

Nominal Voltage 

Minimum Load Requirements
 Maximum Demand
Load Permitted
a. Secondary service normally available from overhead primary distribution
systems (this may require the installation of underground primary to supply a
transformer at ground level.):
 208Y/120  Demand load justifies a
75 kVa transformer
 1,000 kVa  (T)
 |
 240*  5 hp, 3-phase connected  300 kVa  |
 240/120  5 hp, 3-phase connected  300 kVa  |
 480  30 kVa, 3-phase demand  3,000 kVa  |
 480Y/277  30 kVa, 3-phase demand  3,000 kVa  (T)
b. Secondary service from underground primary distribution systems (where
PG&E maintains existing 3-phase primary circuits):
 208Y/120  Demand load justifies a
75 kVa transformer
 1,000 kVa  (T)
 |
 240  10 hp, 3-phase connected  300 kVa  |
 240/120  10 hp, 3-phase connected  300 kVa  |
 480Y/277  Demand load justifies a
75 kVa transformer
 3,000 kVa  |
(T)
c. Secondary service from underground network systems (only in portions of
downtown San Francisco and Oakland):
 208Y/120  None  2,000 kVa  (T)
 480Y/277  1,200 kVa demand load  As required  (T)
 _______________
* Limited availability, consult PG&E.
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 27765-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11266-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 10
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  3353-E  Issued by  Date Filed  October 16, 2008
Decision No.  Brian K. Cherry  Effective  November 15, 2008
Vice President  Resolution No.
10C7   Regulatory Relations
D. GENERAL LOAD LIMITATIONS (Cont'd.)
2. THREE-PHASE SERVICE (2,000 VOLTS OR LESS) (Cont'd.)
d. Where three-phase service is supplied, PG&E reserves the right to use
banks of single-phase transformers or three-phase transformers.
e. Three-phase service will be supplied on request for installations aggregating
less than the minimums listed  above but not less than 3 hp, three-phase,
where existing transformer capacity is available.  If three-phase service is
not readily available, or for service to loads less than 3 hp, service shall be
provided in accordance with either Section H or I of this rule regarding
Connected Load Ratings and Special Facilities.
f. Three-phase metering for one service voltage supplied to installations on
one premise at one delivery location normally is limited to a maximum of a
4,000 ampere service rating.  Metering for larger installations, or installations
having two or more service switches with a combined rating in excess of
4,000 amperes, or service for loads in excess of the maximum demand load
permitted, may be installed provided approval of PG&E has been first
obtained as to the number, size, and location of switches, circuits,
transformers and related facilities.  Service supplied to such approved
installations in excess of one 4,000 ampere switch or breaker at one service
delivery point may be totalized for billing purposes.
(T)
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 27766-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11267-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 11
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  3353-E  Issued by  Date Filed  October 16, 2008
Decision No.  Brian K. Cherry  Effective  November 15, 2008
Vice President  Resolution No.
11C8   Regulatory Relations
D. GENERAL LOAD LIMITATIONS (Cont'd.)
3. THREE-PHASE SERVICE (OVER 2,000 VOLTS)
a. Following are three-phase voltages that are transformed from higher existing
primary distribution voltages and provided only as isolated services for a
single applicant where the applicant's demand load justifies, as determined
by PG&E,  the installation of the minimum size transformer bank used by
PG&E:  

Nominal Voltage
 Minimum Size
Bank Installed
 Maximum Demand
Load Permitted
  2,400 (See Note 1)  500 kVa  5,000 kVa  (T)
   4,160 (See Note 1)  500 kVa  5,000 kVa  |
 12,000 (See Notes 1 and 2)  1,000 kVa  10,000 kVa  (T)
b. Following are the standard primary voltages, one of which  may be available
without transformation from existing  primary distribution lines in the area:
   4,160  100 kVa  4,000 kVa  (T)
 12,000 (See Note 1)  500 kVa  12,000 kVa  |
 17,200  500 kVa  15,000 kVa  |
 20,780  500 kVa  20,000 kVa  (T)
Note 1: Not available in the network areas in portions of downtown
San Francisco and Oakland.
Note 2: Not available where existing primary is 17,200 volts.
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 27767-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11499-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 12
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  3353-E  Issued by  Date Filed  October 16, 2008
Decision No.  Brian K. Cherry  Effective  November 15, 2008
Vice President  Resolution No.
12C7   Regulatory Relations
D. GENERAL LOAD LIMITATIONS (Cont'd.)
3. THREE-PHASE SERVICE (OVER 2,000 VOLTS) (Cont'd.)
c. Applicants with minimum demand loads of 4,000 kVa may elect to take
delivery at the available transmission voltage and provide their own
substation facilities.  The availability of transmission voltages shall be
determined by PG&E.  Where a substation on an applicant's property is
supplied from a transmission voltage source, the metering may be installed,
at PG&E's option, on the secondary side of the transformers and may be
subject to a transformer loss adjustment in accordance with Section B.4 of
this Rule.
d. For its operating convenience and necessity, PG&E may elect to supply an
applicant whose demand load is in excess of 2,000 kVa from a substation on
the applicant's premises supplied from a transmission source.  Refer to
Rule 16 for additional information regarding transformers located on the
applicant's premises.
e. Three-phase service outside the limits of Section D.3 may be available but
only if feasible and approved by PG&E.
f. PG&E reserves the right to change its distribution or transmission voltage to
another standard service voltage when, in its judgment, it is necessary or
advisable for economic reasons or for proper service to its customers.
Where a customer is receiving service at the voltage being changed, the
customer then has the option to:  (1) accept service at the new voltage,
(2) accept service at the secondary side of an additional stage of
transformation to be supplied by PG&E at a location on the customer's
premises in accordance with PG&E's requirements, or (3) contract with
PG&E for an additional stage of transformation to be installed as special
facilities (including any applicable Contributions in Aid of Construction taxes)
under the provisions of Section I, below, whereby the customer will be
considered as accepting service at the primary side of the additional stage of
transformation.  Metering not relocated to the primary side of the additional
stage of transformation will be subject to a transformer loss adjustment in
accordance with Section B.4 of this Rule.  The option to contract with PG&E
for an additional stage of transformation (option 3, above) is available only
once in conjunction with a change in standard voltage by PG&E.
(T)
(T)
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11269-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 10831-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 13
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  1303-E  Issued by  Date Filed  June 21, 1990
Decision No.  Gordon R. Smith  Effective  July 31, 1990
Vice President  Resolution No.
13C1   and Chief Financial Officer
D. GENERAL LOAD LIMITATIONS (Cont'd.)
4. LOAD BALANCE
The applicant must balance his demand load as nearly as practicable between
the two sides of a three-wire single-phase service and between all phases of a
three-phase service.  The difference in amperes between any two phases at the
customer's peak load should not be greater than 10 percent or 50 amperes (at
the service delivery voltage), whichever is greater; except that the difference
between the load on the lighting phase of a four-wire delta service and the load
on the power phase may be more than these limits.  It will be the responsibility of
the customer to keep his demand load balanced within these limits.
 E. PROTECTIVE DEVICES
1. It shall be the applicant's responsibility to furnish, install, inspect and keep in
good and safe condition at his own risk and expense, all appropriate protective
devices of any kind or character, which may be required to properly protect the
applicant's facilities.  PG&E shall not be responsible for any loss or damage
occasioned or caused by the negligence, or  wrongful act of the applicant or of
any of his agents, employees or licensees in omitting, installing, maintaining,
using, operating or interfering with any such protective devices.
2. It shall be the applicant's responsibility to select and install such protective
devices as may be necessary to coordinate properly with PG&E's protective
devices to avoid exposing other customers to unnecessary service interruptions.
3. It shall be the applicant's responsibility to equip his three-phase motor
installations with appropriate protective devices, or use motors with inherent
features, to completely disconnect each such motor from its power supply, giving
particular consideration to the following:
a. Protection in each set of phase conductors to prevent damage due to
overheating in the event of overload.
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11270-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 10831-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 14
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  1303-E  Issued by  Date Filed  June 21, 1990
Decision No.  Gordon R. Smith  Effective  July 31, 1990
Vice President  Resolution No.
14C1   and Chief Financial Officer
E. PROTECTIVE DEVICES (Cont'd.)
3. (Cont'd.)
b. Protection to prevent automatic restarting of motors or  motor driven
machinery which has been subjected to a service interruption and, because
of the nature of the machinery itself or the product it handles, cannot safely
resume operation automatically.
c. Open-phase protection to prevent damage due to overheating  in the event
of loss of voltage on one phase.
d. Reverse-phase protection where appropriate to prevent uncontrolled
reversal of motor rotation in the event of accidental phase reversal.
(Appropriate installations would include, but are not limited to, motors driving
elevators, hoists, tramways, cranes, pumps, conveyors, etc.)
4. The available short-circuit current varies from one location to another, and also
depends on the ultimate design characteristics of PG&E's supply and service
facilities.  Consult PG&E for the ultimate maximum short-circuit current at each
service termination point.
5. Where an applicant proposes to use a ground-fault sensing protective system
which would require special PG&E-owned equipment, such a system may be
installed only where feasible and with written approval of PG&E.
6. Any non-PG&E-owned emergency standby or other generation equipment that
can be operated to supply power to facilities that are also designed to be
supplied from PG&E's system shall be controlled with suitable protective devices
by the applicant to prevent parallel operation with PG&E's system in a fail-safe
manner, such as the use of a double-throw switch to disconnect all conductors,
except where there is a written agreement or service contract with PG&E
permitting such parallel operation.
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11271-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 6931-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 15
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  1303-E  Issued by  Date Filed  June 21, 1990
Decision No.  Gordon R. Smith  Effective  July 31, 1990
Vice President  Resolution No.
15C1   and Chief Financial Officer
F. INTERFERENCE WITH SERVICE
1. GENERAL
PG&E reserves the right to refuse to serve new loads or to continue to supply
existing loads of a size or character that may be detrimental to PG&E's
operations or to the service of its customers.  Any customer who operates or
plans to operate any equipment such as, but not limited to, pumps, welders, saw
mill apparatus, furnaces, compressors or other equipment where the use of
electricity is intermittent, causes intolerable voltage fluctuations, or otherwise
causes intolerable service interference, must reasonably limit such interference
or restrict the use of such equipment upon request by PG&E.  The customer is
required either to provide and pay for whatever corrective measures are
necessary to limit the interference to a level established by PG&E as reasonable,
or avoid the use of such equipment, whether or not the equipment has previously
caused interference.
2. HARMFUL WAVE FORM
Customers shall not operate equipment that superimposes a current of any
frequency or wave form upon PG&E's system, or draws current from PG&E's
system of a harmful wave form, which causes interference with PG&E's
operations, or the service to other customers, or inductive interference to
communication facilities.
3. CUSTOMER'S RESPONSIBILITY
Any customer causing service interference to others must diligently pursue and
take timely corrective action after being given notice and a reasonable time to do
so by PG&E.  If the customer does not take timely corrective action, or continues
to operate the equipment causing the interference without restriction or limit,
PG&E may, without liability, after giving five days written notice to customer,
either install and activate control devices on its facilities that will temporarily
prevent the detrimental operation, or discontinue electric service until a suitable
permanent solution is provided by the customer and it is operational.
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11272-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 6931-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 16
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  1303-E  Issued by  Date Filed  June 21, 1990
Decision No.  Gordon R. Smith  Effective  July 31, 1990
Vice President  Resolution No.
16C1   and Chief Financial Officer
F. INTERFERENCE WITH SERVICE (Cont'd.)
4. MOTOR STARTING CURRENT LIMITATIONS
a. The starting of motors shall be controlled by the customer  as necessary to
avoid causing voltage fluctuations that will be detrimental to the operation of
PG&E's distribution or transmission system, or to the service of any of
PG&E's customers.
b. If the starting current for a single motor installation exceeds the value listed
in Table 1, and the resulting voltage disturbance causes or is expected to
cause detrimental service to others, reduced voltage starters or other
suitable means must be employed, at the customer's expense, to limit the
voltage fluctuations to a tolerable level, except as otherwise provided under
subsections 4.d., 4.e., 4.f., and 4.g.
c. The starting current shall be considered to be the current defined in Note 2
of Table 1.  At its option, PG&E may determine the starting current of a
motor by test, using a stop ammeter with not more than 15 percent
overswing, or an oscillograph, disregarding the value shown for the first
ten cycles after energizing the motor.
d. Where service conditions permit, subject to PG&E's approval, motor starters
may be deferred in the original installation.  PG&E may later order the
installation of a suitable starter or other devices when it has been
determined that the operation of the customer's motors interfere with service
to others.  Also, PG&E may require starting current values  lower than those
set forth herein where conditions at any point on its system require such
reduction to avoid interference with service to other customers.
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 27768-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11273-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 17
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  3353-E  Issued by  Date Filed  October 16, 2008
Decision No.  Brian K. Cherry  Effective  November 15, 2008
Vice President  Resolution No.
17C7   Regulatory Relations
F. INTERFERENCE WITH SERVICE (Cont'd.)
4. MOTOR STARTING CURRENT LIMITATIONS (Cont'd.)
e. In the case of room and unitary air conditioners, heat pumps or other
complete unit equipment on which the nameplate rating is expressed in kVa
input and not in hp output, the nameplate kVa input rating shall be
considered to be the hp rating for use of Table 1.  If the nameplate does not
show kVa input, then it may be determined for single-phase motors by taking
the product of the running input line current in amperes times the input
voltage rating divided by 1,000.  For three-phase motors, multiply this
product by the square root of three (1.73).
f. The starting current values in Table 1 apply only to the installation of a single
motor.  Starters may be omitted on the smaller motors of a group installation
when their omission will not result in a starting current in excess of the
allowable starting current of the largest motor of the group.  Where motors
start simultaneously, they will be treated as a single unit equal to the sum of
their individual starting currents.
g. PG&E may limit the maximum size and type of any motor that may be
operated at any specific location on its system to that which will not be
detrimental to PG&E's system operations or to the service of its customers,
as determined by PG&E.
h. Where the design or operation of the customer's motor is such that unequal
starting currents flow in PG&E's service conductors, the largest starting
current in any one set of phase conductors shall be considered the motor
starting current.
(T)
(T)
(T)
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11274-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 6932-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 18
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  1303-E  Issued by  Date Filed  June 21, 1990
Decision No.  Gordon R. Smith  Effective  July 31, 1990
Vice President  Resolution No.
18C1   and Chief Financial Officer
F. INTERFERENCE WITH SERVICE (Cont'd.)
4. MOTOR STARTING CURRENT LIMITATIONS (Cont'd.)
i. For installations of motors where the equipment is started automatically by
means of float, pressure, or thermostat devices, such as with pumps or wind
machines for frost protection, irrigation pumps or other similar installations,
PG&E may require the customer to install, at his own expense and in
accordance with PG&E's operating requirements, suitable preset time-delay
devices to stagger the automatic connection of load to the supply system
and to prevent simultaneous start-up for any reason.
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11275-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 6932-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 19
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  1303-E  Issued by  Date Filed  June 21, 1990
Decision No.  Gordon R. Smith  Effective  July 31, 1990
Vice President  Resolution No.
19C1   and Chief Financial Officer
F. INTERFERENCE WITH SERVICE (Cont'd.)
4. MOTOR STARTING CURRENT LIMITATIONS (Cont'd.)
TABLE 1
NORMAL MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE MOTOR STARTING CURRENTS
ALTERNATING-CURRENT MOTORS
Rated HP
Single-Phase Voltage
Motor Rating
(Service Voltage)  Three-Phase Voltage
Motor Rating (Service Voltage)
Output   230v (240v)  200v (208v)  230v (240v)  460v (480v)
2  60 amps  –  –  –
3  80  74 amps  64 amps  32 amps
5  120  106  92  46
7.5  170  146  127  63
10  –  186  162  81
15  –  267  232  116
20  –  347  302  151
25  –  428  372  186
30  –  508  442  221
40  –  669  582  291
50  –  830  722  361
60  –  –  –  431
75  –  –  –  536
100  –  –  –  711
Over 100—See Note 3        

Table 1 Notes:
1. See Section F.4. for details on the use of this table.
2. Motor starting current is defined as the steady state current taken from the supply line
with the motor rotor or rotors locked, with all other power consuming components,
including a current-reducing starter, if used, connected in the starting position,
and with rated voltage and frequency applied.
3. The applicant shall consult PG&E for design criteria information for selecting suitable
starting equipment for three-phase a-c motors not shown on Table 1, for d-c motors
supplied directly from existing d-c systems, and for motors that operate at higher
voltage ratings.
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 27769-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11276-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 20
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  3353-E  Issued by  Date Filed  October 16, 2008
Decision No.  Brian K. Cherry  Effective  November 15, 2008
Vice President  Resolution No.
20C7   Regulatory Relations
G. POWER FACTOR
When lighting devices, such as neon, fluorescent, luminous gaseous, mercury vapor,
and other lighting equipment having low power factors are served on street lighting or
area lighting schedules, the customer shall provide, at his own expense, power factor
corrective equipment  to increase the power factor of each complete lighting device to
not less than 90 percent.
H. CONNECTED LOAD RATINGS
1. The connected load is the sum of the rated capacities of all of the customer's
electric utilization equipment that is served through one metering point and that
may be operated at the same time, computed to the nearest one-tenth of a
horsepower, kilowatt or kilovolt-ampere.  Motors will be counted at their
nameplate ratings in horsepower output and other devices at their nameplate
input ratings in kw or kVa, except that resistance welders will be rated in
accordance with the section of this rule regarding "Welder Service."  Unless
otherwise stated in the rate schedule, conversions between horsepower, kw
and/or kVa ratings will be made on a one-to-one basis.
2. The normal operating capacity rating of any motor or other device may be
determined from the nameplate rating.  Where the original nameplate has been
removed or altered, the manufacturer's published rating may be used or the
rating determined by test at the expense of the customer.
3. Motor-generator sets shall be rated at the nameplate rating of the alternatingcurrent drive motor of the set.
4. a. X-ray equipment shall be rated at the maximum nameplate kVa input
operating at the highest rated output amperes.  If the kVa input rating is not
shown, it will be determined for single-phase loads by taking the product of
the amperes input rating times the input voltage rating divided by 1,000.  For
three-phase equipment, multiply this product times the square root of
three (1.73).
(T)
(T)
(T)
(T)
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 27770-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11277-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 21
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  3353-E  Issued by  Date Filed  October 16, 2008
Decision No.  Brian K. Cherry  Effective  November 15, 2008
Vice President  Resolution No.
21C7   Regulatory Relations
H. CONNECTED LOAD RATINGS (Cont'd.)
4. (Cont'd.)
b. Where X-ray equipment is separately metered and supplied from a separate
transformer installed by PG&E to serve the X-ray installation only, the kVa
rating of PG&E's transformer or the total X-ray equipment input capacity,
whichever is smaller, will be considered the load for billing  purposes.
5. Where a customer operates a complete unit of equipment connected for threephase service but consisting of single-phase components which cannot be
readily reconnected for single-phase service, PG&E shall consider the connected
load of such a unit as three-phase load.
6. Where a customer has, or expects to have, permanently-connected, three-phase
load that is used infrequently or for short  durations, such as, but not limited to,
equipment for fire pumps, frost protection, flood control, emergency sirens or
other  similar installations which make it impractical to record proper demands on
a monthly basis for billing purposes, the customer  may, for his own reasons and
with PG&E's approval, guarantee an appropriate billing demand or connected
three-phase load for billing purposes in order to reserve suitable capacity in
PG&E's facilities.
I. SPECIAL FACILITIES
1. PG&E normally installs only those standard facilities which it deems are
necessary to provide regular service in accordance with the tariff schedules.
Where the applicant requests PG&E to install special facilities and PG&E agrees
to make such an installation, the additional costs thereof shall be borne by the
applicant, including such continuing ownership costs as may be applicable.
(T)
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11278-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 6933-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 22
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  1303-E  Issued by  Date Filed  June 21, 1990
Decision No.  Gordon R. Smith  Effective  July 31, 1990
Vice President  Resolution No.
22C1   and Chief Financial Officer
I. SPECIAL FACILITIES (Cont'd.)
2. Special facilities are (a) facilities requested by an applicant which are in addition
to or in substitution for standard facilities which PG&E would normally provide for
delivery of service at one point, through one meter, at one voltage class under its
tariff schedules, or (b) a pro rata portion of the facilities requested by an
applicant, allocated for the sole use of such applicant, which would not normally
be allocated for such sole use.  Unless otherwise provided by PG&E's filed tariff
schedules, special facilities will be installed, owned and maintained or allocated
by PG&E as an accommodation to the applicant only if acceptable for operation
by PG&E and the reliability of service  to PG&E's other customers is not
impaired.
3. Special facilities will be installed under the terms and conditions of a contract in
the form on file with the Commission.  Such contract will include, but is not limited
to, the following terms and conditions:
a. Where new facilities are to be installed for applicant's use as special
facilities, the applicant shall advance to PG&E the estimated additional
installed cost of the special facilities over the estimated cost of standard
facilities.  At PG&E's option, PG&E may finance the new facilities.
b. A monthly cost-of-ownership charge shall be paid by  applicant for the
special facilities:
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 27071-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 14055-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 23
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  3153-E-A  Issued by  Date Filed  February 20, 2008
Decision No.  07-07-019  Effective  May 12, 2008
  Resolution No.
23C2
I. SPECIAL FACILITIES (Cont’d.)
3. (Cont’d.)
b. (Cont’d.)
TYPE OF FACILITY  FINANCING MONTHLY CHARGE
Transmission (60kv and over)*  Customer  0.31% of the amount advanced
  PG&E  1.14% of the additional cost 

Distribution  Customer  0.46% of the amount advanced
  PG&E  1.40% of the additional cost  (I)
c. Where existing facilities are allocated for applicant’s use as special facilities,
the applicant shall pay a monthly Cost of Ownership charge.  This monthly
Cost of Ownership charge shall be based on the estimated installed cost of
that portion of the existing facilities which is allocated to the customer.
d. Where PG&E determines the collection of continuing monthly Cost of
Ownership charges is not practicable, the applicant will be required to make
an equivalent one-time payment in lieu of the monthly Cost of Ownership
charges.
e. All monthly Cost of Ownership charges shall be reviewed and re-filed with
the Commission when changes occur in PG&E’s cost of providing such
service.
    (T)
    (T)
    (T)
    (T)
    (T)
    (T)
 _______________
* For the purposes of applying the special transmission facilities charge, special
transmission facilities are those facilities in the "100 series" of the standard PG&E
system of accounts (FERC Account Nos. 352-359).
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 27771-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11280-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 24
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  3353-E  Issued by  Date Filed  October 16, 2008
Decision No.  Brian K. Cherry  Effective  November 15, 2008
Vice President  Resolution No.
24C7   Regulatory Relations
J. WELDER SERVICE
1. RATING OF WELDERS
Electric welders will be rated for billing purposes as follows:
a. MOTOR-GENERATOR ARC WELDERS – The horsepower rating of the
motor driving a motor-generating type arc welder will be taken as the
horsepower rating of the welder.
b. TRANSFORMER ARC WELDERS – Nameplate maximum kVa input (at
rated output amperes) will be taken as the rating of transformer type arc
welders.
c. RESISTANCE WELDERS – Resistance welder ratings will be determined by
multiplying the welder transformer nameplate rating (at 50 percent duty
cycle) by the appropriate factor listed below:
(T)
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 27772-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11281-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 25
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  3353-E  Issued by  Date Filed  October 16, 2008
Decision No.  Brian K. Cherry  Effective  November 15, 2008
Vice President  Resolution No.
25C7   Regulatory Relations
J. WELDER SERVICE (Cont'd.)
1. RATING OF WELDERS (Cont'd.)
     FACTOR  

TYPE OF WELDER 

TRANSFORMER
NAMEPLATE RATING
@ 50% Duty Cycle**
 PG&EOwned
Distrib.
Transf.
 Customer
Owned
Distrib.
Transf.
1. Rocker Arm, Press or
Projection Spot
 20 kVa or less  0.60  0.50  (T)
2. Rocker Arm, Press Spot
Project Spot
Flash or Butt
Seam or Portable Gun
 Over 20 kVa
21 to 75 kVa, inclusive
100 kVa or over
All sizes
 0.80  0.60  (T)
(T)
(T)
3. Flash or Butt  67 to 100 kVa, inclusive  ***  ***
(T)
4. Projection Spot
Flash or Butt
 Over 75 kVa
66 kiva or less
 1.20  0.90
(T)
 _______________
** The kVa rating of all resistance welders to which these rating procedures are applied
must be at or equivalent to 50 percent duty cycle operation.  Duty cycle is the percent of
the time welding current flows during a given operating cycle.  If the operating kVa
nameplate rating is for some other operating duty cycle, then the thermally equivalent
kVa  rating at 50 percent duty cycle must be calculated.
*** Each flash or butt welder in this group will be rated at 80 kVa where distribution
transformer is owned by PG&E or 60 kVa where distribution transformer is owned by
the customer.
(T)
(T)
(T)
(T)
(T)
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 27773-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11282-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 26
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

      (Continued)
Advice Letter No:  3353-E  Issued by  Date Filed  October 16, 2008
Decision No.  Brian K. Cherry  Effective  November 15, 2008
Vice President  Resolution No.
26C7   Regulatory Relations
J. WELDER SERVICE (Cont'd.)
1. RATING OF WELDERS (Cont'd.)
d. Ratings prescribed by a., b. and c. above, normally will be determined from
nameplate data or from data supplied by the manufacturer.  If such data are
not available or are believed by either PG&E or customer to be unreliable,
the rating will be determined by test at the expense of the customer.
e. If established by seals approved by PG&E, the welder rating may be limited
by the sealing of taps which provide capacity greater than the selected tap
and/or by the interlocking lockout of one or more welders with other welders.
f. When conversion of units is required for tariff application, one welder kVa
will be taken as one horsepower for tariffs stated on a horsepower basis and
one welder kVa will be taken as one kilowatt for tariffs stated on a kilowatt
basis.
2. BILLING OF WELDERS
Welders will be billed at the regular rates and conditions of the tariffs on which
they are served, subject to the following provisions:
a. CONNECTED LOAD TYPE OF SCHEDULE
Welder load will be included as part of the connected load with ratings as
determined under Section 1, above, based on the maximum load that can be
connected at any one time, and no allowance will be made for diversity
between welders.
(T)
(T)
 Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 27774-E
Cancelling Revised  Cal. P.U.C. Sheet No. 11283-E 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company
San Francisco, California
U 39
ELECTRIC RULE NO. 2  Sheet 27
DESCRIPTION OF SERVICE    

Advice Letter No:  3353-E  Issued by  Date Filed  October 16, 2008
Decision No.  Brian K. Cherry  Effective  November 15, 2008
Vice President  Resolution No.
27C7   Regulatory Relations
J. WELDER SERVICE (Cont'd.)
2. BILLING OF WELDERS (Cont'd.)
b. DEMAND METERED TYPE OF SCHEDULE
Where resistance welders are served on these schedules, the computation
of diversified resistance welder load shall be made as follows:
Multiply the individual resistance welder ratings, as prescribed in
Sections 1.c. to 1.f. inclusive, above, by the following factors and adding
the results thus obtained:
1.0 times the rating of the largest welder
0.8 times the rating of the next largest welder
0.6 times the rating of the next largest welder
0.4 times the rating of the next largest welder
0.2 times the ratings of all additional welders
If this computed, diversified, resistance welder load is greater than the
metered demand, the diversified resistance welder load will be used in
lieu of the metered demand for rate computation purposes.
3. USE OF WELDERS THROUGH RESIDENTIAL SERVICE
Any welder exceeding three kVa capacity at 50 percent duty cycle supplied
through a residential service requires advance approval by PG&E.

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